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Photo: Jeremy Glynn

Sandiso Sibisi’s parents taught her to give generously of her time, and to make a difference in others’ lives.

So, in 2010, she enlisted fellow young professionals and friends as tutors when she started the Plough Back Tutoring Program for high-school leaners. In 2013, Sibisi shifted her focus to young women seeking employment with the launch of Born to Succeed.

“Born to Succeed offers work-readiness training for skills like CVs and letter writing,” says Sibisi, who was chosen as a 2016 Young African Leaders Initiative fellow. “We also offer mentorship from industry professionals.”

Those professionals include her colleagues at Accenture, where she works as an Intrapreneur. Born to Succeed boasts a 90% placement rate and has helped over 120 women find work in administrative positions, and in the agriculture and hospitality industries.

Soon, Born to Succeed’s curriculum will be available to rural and periurban job seekers through their “Khwela” mobile app, which is currently in its pilot phase.

Last year Sibisi presented “Khwela” at the World Bank Youth Summit in Washington, where it was chosen as one of six finalists – a worthy accolade for a project that has the power to change lives, one skill at a time.

|There is nothing wrong with small beginnings.|